Saturday, April 03, 2010

The Chicago Police - Christ and the Harrowing of Hell

Today, in Catholic and most Christian liturgical observances, witnesses the Harrowing of Hell.

Following His death on the Cross, Jesus descended into Hell ( Sheol in Hebrew) and freed the good people from Satan and Death.

"We got shots fired over here!" Chicago Police Officer heard on News video.

Everyday is Holy Saturday for the women and men of the Chicago Police Department. On that Channel News Video from Thursday caught in full truth and it is remarkable to witness the Chicago Police Officers charge to sound of gunfire while the good people and victims protect themselves as best they can. Click my post title for the heroic Truth about Chicago Police Officers

Christ Harrowed - Looted - Hell of the Good and freed us from Death and the lure of Satan -ha-Satan ("the accuser") Hebrew.

Chicago Police are accused every day of every sin and motivation by lawyers and politicians who get rich off of the suffering people of Englewood, Austin, Gresham, Roseland & etc. They really get the truth tossed at them

These places are madhouses of criminal activity and tie down precious resources which could be deployed fighting crime," Weis said.

The 41 people shot between the end of Wednesday and 2 a.m. Friday included four people who were wounded outside the Magnolia nightclub near 122nd and Halsted, Weis said.

Other shooting sites included Bronzeville, Grand Crossing and South Shore. During one especially violent stretch, 16 people were shot in a little more than two hours.

Among those was a woman who said she was shot in the arm in Millennium Park about 12:30 a.m., but did not report it until she was treated in a Melrose Park hospital. Police have questioned where the shooting happened.

Weis noted that the second Englewood shooting occurred despite the immediate presence of three dozen heavily armed and uniformed police officers.

"It shows the complete brazen lack of respect for authority." Weis said. "The question that I have to ask is, what would they do when we're not here?"

This is the Old English and Middle English term for the triumphant descent of Christ into hell (or Hades) between the time of His Crucifixion and His Resurrection, when, according to Christian belief, He brought salvation to the souls held captive there since the beginning of the world. According to the "New English Dictionary" the word Harrowing in the above connection first occurs in Aelfric's homilies, about A.D. 1000; but, long before this, the descent into hell had been related in the Old English poems connected with the name of Caedmon and Cynewulf. Writers of Old English prose homilies and lives of saints continually employ the subject, but it is in medieval English literature that it is most fully found, both in prose and verse, and particularly in the drama. Art and literature all through Europe had from early times embodied in many forms the Descent into Hell, and specimens plays upon this theme in various European literatures still exist, but it is in Middle English dramatic literature that we find the fullest and most dramatic development of the subject. The earliest specimen extant of the English religious drama is upon the Harrowing of Hell, and the four great cycles of English mystery plays each devote to it a separate scene. It is found also in the ancient Cornish plays. These medieval versions of the story, while ultimately based upon the New Testament and the Fathers, have yet, in their details, been found to proceed from the apocryphal Gospel of Nicodemus, the literary form of a part of which is said to date back to the second of third century. In its Latin form this "gospel" was known in England from a very early time; Bede and other Old English writers are said to show intimate acquaintance with it. English translations were made of it in the Middle Ages, and in the long Middle English poem known as "Cursor Mundi" a paraphrase of it is found.

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